American Heart Association

Conference

ESOC 2021: Challenging Clinical Situations in Stroke Medicine (and Tips to Face Them)

Aurora Semerano, MD
@semerano_aurora

European Stroke Organisation Conference
September 1–3, 2021

Session: “Acute Stroke Treatment in Difficult Clinical Situations: In-Hospital Strokes and Other Challenges,” September 2, 2021

Making decisions in stroke medicine is a difficult task and may turn to be really challenging in selected cases, which, however, are quite frequent in our clinical practice. These daily challenges were the focus of the discussion in the session chaired by Daniel Strbian (Finland) and Silke Walter (Germany). Also, some useful tips for more confident decisions were proposed.

When deciding about thrombolysis in patients with recent surgery, existing studies are mostly retrospective and heterogenous, thus evidence for the best practice is very low. Gordian J. Hubert (Germany) suggested a comprehensive approach, which includes the evaluation of the risk of bleeding in the surgical wound (in terms of size, time from surgery, vascularization of the tissue), the damage of a potential bleeding in that site, and the possibility of measures to efficiently stop the bleeding (i.e., compressibility, surgical intervention). Similarly, in patients with recent trauma, the evaluation of the bleeding risk at the trauma site can be crucial, whereas estimating the damage of a potential bleeding may be challenging since location of trauma is often unknown.

ESOC 2021: Thrombosis and Inflammation Team Up in Ischemic Stroke

Aurora Semerano, MD
@semerano_aurora

European Stroke Organisation Conference
September 1–3, 2021

Session: “Inflammation, Thrombosis and Stroke Pathogenesis,” September 3, 2021

The complex interplay between inflammation and thrombosis in ischemic stroke was the subject of the interesting scientific session chaired by Mervyn D. Vergouwen (Netherlands) and Christoph Kleinschnitz (Germany). The five speakers dissected the topic by presenting the main players involved in pathophysiology of stroke-related thrombo-inflammation, and prospected potential interventions of immune modulation.

Bernhard Nieswandt (Germany) showed how platelets, besides their well-established functions, have a critical role in inflammation. They are involved not only in the process of thrombus formation, but also in the subsequent mechanisms of infarct growth. Identifying the optimal target to interfere with platelet activity is crucial, due to the possible risk of hemorrhagic transformation. Two promising axes are discussed, namely the immunomodulatory function of von Willebrand Factor through its receptor on platelets Glycoprotein Ib, and the interplay with the kallikrein system and Factor XII activation. The resulting infiltration of immune cells (including T cells) into the ischemic brain contributes to the damage. Importantly, he pointed out that thrombo-inflammation doesn’t start after recanalization, but it is still ongoing during the occlusion, sustained by the collateral blood flow. This is supported in humans by a recent elegant work,1 which reported for the first time that leukocytes strongly accumulate in cerebral vessels distal to the occlusion. Bearing this in mind is fundamental to designing the optimal treatment.

ESOC 2021 Session: “Non-Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment: Something New in the Pipeline?”

Karissa Arthur, MD

European Stroke Organisation Conference
September 1–3, 2021

Dual Antiplatelet Therapy for Minor Acute Ischemic Stroke: Clopidogrel vs Ticagrelor: Pierre Amarenco, Paris University

In this session, Dr. Amarenco compared clopidogrel versus ticagrelor for minor acute ischemic stroke. He first summarized data for aspirin monotherapy showing that it reduces the risk of ischemic stroke by 60%, and the 6-week risk of disabling stroke by 70%. He then called to attention the CHANCE and POINT trials, as well as a pooled analysis of both, showing that dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin plus clopidogrel after a minor stroke or TIA is 34% superior to aspirin alone in preventing stroke in the first 21 days. Dr. Amarenco went on to discuss the shortcomings of clopidogrel, with specific regard to CYP2C19 loss of function carriers in which there is less efficacy for stroke prevention. In contrast to clopidogrel, ticagrelor is a direct acting drug which does not require biotransformation, binds reversibly to platelets, has faster onset, higher platelet inhibition, and faster offset and therefore has a more attractive profile than clopidogrel. 

ESOC 2021 Session: “Targeting Cardiac Disease in Stroke Prevention: Joint Session With the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)”

Thomas Meinel, MD
@TotoMynell

European Stroke Organisation Conference
September 1–3, 2021

Stroke prevention — especially in patients with atrial fibrillation — is a team effort of cardiologists and vascular neurologists. Vice-versa, work-up of cardiac disease and cardioaortic sources of embolism is a joint effort of stroke physicians and cardiologists. Several novel diagnostic options, medical therapies and devices are available in the cardiovascular field. Hence, this joint session of the ESO and ESC was a logical consequence of intensified collaboration of these two big societies.

The first speaker was Marta Rubiera from Spain, who elaborated on the diagnostic options to identify structural cardioaortic sources of embolism in stroke patients. Presenting the expected diagnostic findings and weighing nicely the pros and cons of each modality, she guided the audience to choose the correct test according to the patient and the stroke characteristics. Cardiac MRI and cardiac CT represent novel diagnostic options in selected patients, but echocardiography remains the working horse of stroke work-up. However, the lack of randomized diagnostic studies with clinical outcomes and the uncertainty of what to do with minor sources of embolism remain a major drawback of this daily task during stroke unit rounds. Joint efforts of cardiology and neurology are necessary to overcome this evidence gap.

ESOC 2021 Session: “Large Artery Stroke: Carotid Disease, Plaque and Beyond”

Karissa Arthur, MD

European Stroke Organisation Conference
September 1–3, 2021

Cervical Artery Dissection: Christopher Traenka, University Hospital Basel

Dr. Traenka discussed carotid artery dissection (CeAD) in this talk. He first discussed CeAD and sports. Patients with CeAD obtained during stroke should refrain from any sports activities for at least one month, and this period may need to be prolonged considering the patient’s clinical course. When resuming activities, patients should start at low intensity and gradually increase activity. Most patients will go back to full activity in 6-12 months.

ESOC 2021 Session: “Closing Ceremony and Large Clinical Trials 2”

Vignan Yogendrakumar, MD, MSc
@VYogendrakumar

European Stroke Organisation Conference
September 1–3, 2021

Wrapping up our coverage of this year’s ESOC, the second round of results from major clinical trials!

APACHE-AF: Apixaban after Anticoagulation-Associated Intracerebral Hemorrhage In Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: A Randomized, Open-Label, Phase 2 Trial

APACHE-AF was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial, recruiting adults with a history of atrial fibrillation and anticoagulation associated ICH. Following their ICH event (days 7-90 days post ICH event), participants were randomized to apixaban 5mg twice daily or to avoiding anticoagulation. Primary outcome was vascular death or non-fatal stroke and was evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Between January 16, 2015 and July 6, 2020, 101 participants (46% female, median age 77 years) were recruited at a median of 46 (IQR 21-74) days after ICH in an intention to treat analysis. Participants were followed for a median of 1.9 (IQR 1.0-3.1) years. There were 10 patients who crossed over. For the primary outcome, comparing Apixaban to Avoiding Anticoagulation: Adjusted HR: 1.05 (0.48-2.31), indicating no major difference between the two groups. There were no major differences in subsequent ICH between the two groups.

ESOC 2021 Session: “Presidential Symposium Awards and Large Clinical Studies”

Thomas Meinel, MD
@TotoMynell

European Stroke Organisation Conference
September 1–3, 2021

The first part of the symposium was the awards ceremony for the presidential awards for 2021 and 2020 for exceptional late-stage researchers. The awardees were Professor Michael Brainin, past ESO and WSO president and founder of the ESO European Stroke Master programme, followed by Professor Bo Norrving, editor-in-chief of the European Stroke Journal, ESO founding member, past WSO president, and past ESO vice-president. Both were honored for their outstanding contributions to both stroke research and development of the ESO.

Next up were the awardees of the Scientific Excellence Award of 2021 and 2020. The first awardee was Professor Georgios Tsivgoulis, the vice-president of ESO. He not only contributed significantly to the recent guidelines on intravenous thrombolysis and blood pressure management, but he also has an impressive scientific track record with a special focus on evidence synthesis. The second awardee was Professor Urs Fischer, the former ESO secretary general. He is the principal investigator of several multicenter international trials answering burning questions of present stroke care with important results presented at this conference. Both awardees pointed out that clinical research is a team effort and dedicated their award to the study teams, collaborators, and PhD students.

ESOC 2021 Session: “Scientific Communication 06 – Acute Treatment and Thrombolysis”

Vignan Yogendrakumar, MD, MSc
@VYogendrakumar

European Stroke Organisation Conference
September 1–3, 2021

This session opened with a presentation by Dr. Mikhail Kalinin and the CEREHETIS Investigators on the potential neuroprotective effect of Cerebrolysin as an add-on therapy during acute reperfusion. In a pilot RCT designed to assess safety, patients were randomized to cerebrolysin + IV tPA versus IV tPA alone. The primary outcome of the study was post-treatment symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. 117 patients were randomized to the intervention arm, while 201 were randomized to the control arm.  Symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation occurred at lower rates in those who received cerebrolysin + thrombolysis, compared to thrombolysis alone. However, functional outcomes (mRS ≤ 2) did not differ between the two groups.

This was followed by a presentation by Dr. Wayneho Kan and the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines-Stroke group. Using the registry of 160,000+ patients, Dr. Kan presented on the outcomes of tPA use in patients who were on a NOAC versus those not on anticoagulation using propensity score overlap weighting and regression modelling. Adjusting for baseline clinical factors, the risks of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage did not differ between the two groups (sICH: aOR, 0.88 [95%CI, 0.70-1.10]; in-hospital mortality: aOR, 0.84 [95%CI, 0.69-1.01]). Of note, the exact time of last NOAC dose was not measured in this registry, and levels of factor Xa were also not available. Based on an analysis of a smaller registry used within this study which reported time of NOAC dose, a large majority of NOAC patients treated with lysis had taken their last dose more than 24 hours prior to the stroke event.

Fluoxetine in Stroke Fails to Deliver

Muhammad Rizwan Husain, MD
@RIZWANHUSAINMD  

Lundström E, Isaksson E, Greilert Norin N, Näsman P, Wester P, Mårtensson B, Norrving B, Wallén H, Borg J, Hankey GJ, et al. Effects of Fluoxetine on Outcomes at 12 Months After Acute Stroke: Results From EFFECTS, a Randomized Controlled Trial. Stroke. 2021.

The Efficacy oF Fluoxetine—a randomisEd Controlled Trial in Stroke (EFFECTS) was a randomized clinical trial whose primary outcome was to assess if oral fluoxetine initiated within 2-15 days of an acute stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) and taken up to 6 months improved functional outcomes. The initial trial results, which were published in August 2020, demonstrated no improvement in functional outcomes (modified Rankin Score-mRS-adjusted odds ratio: 0.94 [95% CI 0.78–1.13]) at 6 months with fluoxetine use and noted an increased rate of fractures and hyponatremia, though occurrence of depression was reduced (by 4%).

The authors now report 12-month follow-up results on outcomes that include the mRS, health status, quality of life, fatigue, mood and depression to see if any effects of fluoxetine persisted or were delayed.

Article Commentary: “Switching to Tenecteplase for Stroke Thrombolysis: Real-World Experience and Outcomes in a Regional Stroke Network”

Ericka Samantha Teleg, MD

Mahawish K, Gommans J, Kleinig T, Lallu B, Tyson A, Ranta A. Switching to Tenecteplase for Stroke Thrombolysis: Real-World Experience and Outcomes in a Regional Stroke Network. Stroke. 2021.

Accessibility to stroke services, timely treatment and management differ in regions and locations throughout the world. Each geographic location is different in terms of barriers to stroke treatment. Evidence translated to real-world findings is an important key element in this article by Mahawish et al. The New Zealand Central Region Hyper-Acute Stroke Network switched to tenecteplase driven by data supporting probable improvement of large vessel occlusion (LVO) recanalization in areas wherein, first, endovascular accessibility is a challenge due to geographical limitations, and second, the ease of tenecteplase administration. This model can contribute to other regions that have similar landscape in terms of medical resources and accessibility to tertiary or regional centers with endovascular administration infrastructure.