American Heart Association

Monthly Archives: April 2020

Mechanical Thrombectomy in Vertebrobasilar Occlusion: Still Looking for Evidence

Elena Zapata-Arriaza, MD
@ElenaZaps

Liu X, Dai Q, Ye R, Zi W, Liu Y, Wang H, et al. Endovascular treatment versus standard medical treatment for vertebrobasilar artery occlusion (BEST): an open-label, randomised controlled trial. Lancet Neurol. 2020;19:115-122.

Efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment (EVT) in anterior circulation strokes is clearly validated; however, such evidence is still lacking in vertebrobasilar occlusions. Liu et al. aimed to demonstrate safety and efficacy of EVT in posterior circulation strokes. To achieve this goal, the authors performed a multicenter, randomized, open-label trial in patients within 8 h of vertebrobasilar occlusion (basilar or V4 segment of vertebral artery). Patients were allocated to receive either EVT plus standard medical therapy or standard medical therapy alone. Given endovascular procedure, stent-retriever was the most employed technique, but thromboaspiration, intra-arterial thrombolysis, balloon angioplasty or stenting were also permitted. Primary outcome was mRS 0-3 at 90 days, assessed on an intention-to-treat basis. Primary safety outcome was mortality at 90 days. Secondary safety endpoints included symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, device-related complications and other severe events rates. Each participating center had to have completed at least 5 mechanical thrombectomy procedures with stent retriever devices in the preceding year. The primary data analysis was done on the intention-to-treat population. In addition, secondary prespecified analyses were performed in the per-protocol population and in the as-treated population.

Author Interview: Dr. Houman Khosravani, MD, PhD, on “Protected Code Stroke: Hyperacute Stroke Management During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic”

Houman Khosravani
Houman Khosravani

A conversation with Houman Khosravani, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Canada. Twitter: @neuroccm

Interviewed by Victor J. Del Brutto, MD, Assistant Professor, Stroke Division, Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Florida. Twitter: @vdelbrutto

They will be discussing the paper “Protected Code Stroke: Hyperacute Stroke Management During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic,” published in Stroke.

Dr. Del Brutto: First of all, I would like to thank you and your team for putting together these thoughtful recommendations on how to evaluate patients with suspected stroke during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. As a stroke neurologist, I share the global feeling of uncertainty that this pandemic has caused and look forward to modifying my institution practices in order to maximize patients’ outcomes, their safety, and the safety of the professionals involved in their care. In your article, you mention that stroke patients are at an increased risk of suboptimal outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Could you please comment on the factors that may influence patient outcomes?

Dr. Khosravani: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients are affected at several junctions in stroke care, including during the hyperacute phase. For example, paramedics responding to a stroke call, in some jurisdictions, will begin the screening process prior to arrival and then again on scene. When screening is positive, pre-notification to the hospital should occur, and this triggers a protected code stroke (PCS). Patients being brought directly to the ED will require additional screening. The necessary use of PPE, with a Safety Lead observing, will add some delays to the front-end processes, but these are essential to keeping providers safe. It is very plausible that, for example, door-to-needle/door-to-groin puncture times will be impacted. Similarly, at the point-of-care, a COVID-19–suspected patient going to imaging will result in having special precautions used in the scanner or neuroangiography suite, which will add additional time (for cleaning as well); this impacts scenarios with back-to-back code strokes as well.